Teacher Tap

Course Activities: Expert Interaction Approach

Mr. Donaldson is a detective in Hamilton County specializing in cybercrime...

Ms. Crosby has taught special education for 20 years are will be available to...

Kristy Smith and Ray Carlos will be posting this week's course highlights...

Interacting with outside experts can help learners connect course content to real-world experiences.

Professionals as Experts

Invite professionals in the field of study to interact with your students.

Identify Experts. How are experts identified?

Explore Options. How will the expert be involved with your class?

Prepare Students. How will you prepare your students for interaction?

Prepare the Expert. How will you prepare your expert?

Nurture Connections. How do you establish and maintain a group of experts?

Share Experiences. How do you extend the experience?

If live interactions aren't possible, consider recorded interviews along with readings. Explore the Interview Index at The Lives of Teachers as an example.

Learn more at Collaboration: Ask-An-Expert from Teacher Tap

Students as Experts

As your students become more familiar with course content, get them involved with sharing their understandings with classmates.

Highlights. Rather than everyone doing everything, ask students to summarize the key points of a unit or discussions. Students might be responsible for 1 topic during the semester. Although this may be in paragraph form, you can also ask for:

Explore examples of students as presenters:

Student Bloggers. Involve students in providing examples and sample problems.

To find more examples, do a Google search for your topic and add the word "experts".

remindersReminders!
Interacting with outside experts can help learners connect course content to real-world experiences.

apply itApply It!
Explore examples of expert interactions.

List the pros and cons of using this approach with your content.



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