Teacher Tap

Workshop Materials: The Guide

This page guides you through the workshop materials for Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3.

For specific due dates, go to the Course Calendar on the Syllabus.

Part 1 -
Course Content, Organization, and Web Development

In the first section of the workshop, we'll look at the "big picture" of our course. We'll explore the basics of distance education and analyze our learners. Next, we'll identify our course content and design a course guide. Finally, we'll also learn the basics of using Dreamweaver as a web development tool and begin building our course materials.

Getting Started

Read the Workshop Materials and Workshop Requirements.

Read the Workshop Content page for an overview of the course materials.

small group activitiesIntroduce Yourself (2 Points)
Let's get to know each other. Go to Oncourse, locate our course, choose Forums, locate the Introduce Yourself forum, and share the following information in a a message.
1 - Introduce yourself to the class. Include your name in the subject of the message. Provide a little personal and professional information about yourself.
2 - Share something you've done that you don't think anyone else in the class has experienced.
3 - Also tell us about your online experiences. Have you taken online courses before? If yes, what did you like and dislike about this approach? If not, tell us about your other online activities. Do you surf, use Facebook, or maybe avoid the computer outside class?
4. What experiences have you had with distance learning (Not restricted to Web or online activities)? Summarize some of your thinking of the potential of distance learning for libraries.
5. Share the topic of the online course you plan to work on during this workshop.

Post your message. Then, go back and skim the introductions.
Comment on someone else's experiences.
Reply to at least one person who is working on a topic of interest or expertise. Maybe you took this course in the past or enjoy the topic. Keep this person in mind for future collaborations.

Identifying Elements of
Effective Distance Learning Courses and Online Projects and Programs

Read The Basics page for an introduction to teaching and learning at a distance. Also, read The Basics: Definitions and The Basics: Eight Elements of Effective Online Courses.

Designing for Diverse Learners:
Motivation, Self-Regulation, Learning Styles and Differentiation

Read The Learners for an overview to the needs of distance learners. Also, read Distance Learning Survey, Learning Styles, Multiple Intelligences, Motivation and Engagement, and Self-Regulation.

discussionDeep Discussion 1: Learners and Learning (2 Points Posting, 1 Point Reply)
Review the Eight Elements of Effective Online Courses. Based on your experiences as an instructional developer, educator, librarians, or distance learning student, what do you think makes a successful online course or online library program? Why?

Invent a NINTH element to add to the list and provide an example. It might elaborate on one of the existing elements or add a dimension that was missing from the list. Discuss why you think this is an important element.

Next, create a list of the ways that you learn best. What do you avoid when learning? What do you look for in online learning environments? How do you think you're like and unlike the typical end user?

Provide at least THREE examples of how the distance learning environment can accommodate individual differences and learning styles.

Post your message. Then, go back and skim the elements submitted by your peers. Provide feedback, add an example, or enhance the submission of at least one classmate.

Organizing Course and Program Content:
Structure, Elements, and Formats

Read Course Content for an overview to identifying and organizing course materials. Also, read Structure, Elements, and Formats.

discussionDeep Discussion 2: Course Content (2 Points Posting, 1 Point Reply)
Review the Course Content section of the workshop. Go to MIT OpenCourseWare or the Highlights for High School. Explore one of the Most Visited Courses along with other courses at the website. Select one course.

Share the URL and answer the following questions: How is the course structured (i.e., big picture, readability, chunking content, examples)? What elements are included (i.e., text, graphics, animation, audio, video)? What formats are used (i.e., blogs, interactives, multimedia, MUVE, PDFs, webcomics, web pages)? If you were redesigning this course, what would you add or change to enhance the course? Why?

Post your message.
Then, skim the postings of your classmates. Compare the course you reviewed to their course. Share your findings.

Developing Course and Program Guides:
Scaffolds for Learning

Read Course Guides for an overview to student support materials. Also, read Reception Scaffolds, Transformation Scaffolds, and Production Scaffolds.

Read Building Course Materials Using Dreamweaver.

discussionDeep Discussion 3: Course and Program Guides (2 Points Posting, 1 Point Reply)
Review the Course Guides section of the website. Plan the basic structure of your course or online program. Using a template in Dreamweaver that we've provided, Google Sites, wiki, or your own web-based tool, create the basic web pages of your project. Then, build a Reception, Transformation, OR Production Scaffold for your course such as a glossary, classification web, pathfinder, or step-by-step instructions.

Share the URL in your posting. You must build web pages, not just a Word document.

Post your message.
Then, skim the postings of your classmates. Provide suggestions, examples, resources, and/or other supportive information or ideas for at least one classmate.

Part 2 -
Focus on Learning Communities and Communication

In this section of the course, we'll focus on learning communities and course communication. First, we'll examine and select course communication tools. Next, we'll explore ways to establish and nurture an online community. We'll also explore ways to create cohort groups and build cooperative and collaborative activities. Finally, we'll create discussion activities.

 

Using Communication Tools

Read Course Communication. Also, read Asynchronous and Synchronous.

Establishing and Nurturing Community:
Creating Cohort, Cooperative and Collaborative Activities

Read Community, Cohorts, and Collaboration. Also, read, Community Building, Cohort Groups, and Collaboration.

discussionSelect ONE of the following two options: (2 Points Posting, 1 Point Reply)

Deep Discussion 4.1: Communication Tools
Brainstorm the online communication tools that you've used in the past.

Working with at least one other classmate, try two synchronous tools such as chat, instant messenging, Second Life, Skype, Elluminate, or another synchronous tool. Also, try two asynchronous tools such as a Google Docs, social network, blog, wiki, or VoiceThread. Provide a screen shot or transcript of each of your 4 experiences. Compare and contrast these tools as options for communication and collaboration activities.

Post your message.
Then, skim the postings of your classmates. Provide suggestions, examples, resources, and/or other supportive information or ideas for at least one classmate.


- OR -

Deep Discussion 4.2: Community and Collaboration

What do you think are the most important aspects of online community building? Propose a specific distance learning course, program or project (i.e., online book club, afterschool reading program, Senior craft club, family history program, British literature course, or any other idea). Discuss the online activities that will help this group build a sense of community. Provide specific examples. Also, discuss the communication tools you would use.

Note: You may use the same topic from another deep discussion, but not the same as your final project.

Post your message.
Then, skim the postings of your classmates. Provide suggestions, examples, resources, and/or other supportive information or ideas for at least one classmate.

Creating Discussion Activities

Read Course Discussion.

discussionSelect ONE of the following two options: (2 Points Posting, 1 Point Reply)

Deep Discussion 5: Online Discussions
Propose a course, project or program. Create a series of discussion questions for your course or program. Develop questions from at least THREE different categories. Post these questions along with a statement of the purpose of each item or your reasoning for this approach. How will these questions engage your partipants in meaningful discussions?

Also discuss an online discussion technology tool that you think would work well for this project. Would you use blog comments, wiki discussion tab, social network software such as ning, forum tools such as Google Groups, or other tools for your project?

Note: You may use the same topic from another deep discussion, but not the same as your final project.

Post your message.
Then, skim the postings of your classmates. Provide suggestions, examples, resources, and/or other supportive information or ideas for at least one classmate
.

 

Part 3 -
Focus on Practical, Engaging Learning Experiences

The final section of the course involves creating practical, engaging learning experiences. First, we'll explore the wide range of activities. Next, we'll examine alternative assessments. Finally we'll explore issues in course management. The workshop will end with ten facts of life for online learning.

Creating Engaging Activities

Read Course Activities.

Creating Effective Assessments

Read Course Assessment.

discussionSelect ONE of the following two options: (2 Points Posting, 1 Point Reply)

Deep Discussion 6: Engaging Activities and Assessments
Design a series of activities for a course, program, or project. Develop activities from at least THREE different categories. Also, discuss why you think these activities are particularly useful for this situation. Share these activities in the discussion forum.

Also, design an assessment to match one of your activities. Keep in mind that this does not need to be an academic type assessment such as a quiz. It may be a checklist of activity elements, a set of review questions, or an opportunity to reflect on the activity.

Note: You may use the same topic from another deep discussion, but not the same as your final project.

Post your message.
Then, skim the postings of your classmates. Provide suggestions, examples, resources, and/or other supportive information or ideas for at least one classmate.


Managing Online Courses: A Practical Approach

Read Course Management.

discussionDeep Discussion 7: Course and Program Management (2 Points Posting, 1 Point Reply)
Discuss what you think are the THREE biggest issues in online course, project, or program management (i.e., technology access, technology use, scheduling, recruitment of participants, advertising, ongoing involvement, maintenance). How will you address each of these issues? Provide specific examples.

Post your message.
Then, skim the postings of your classmates. Provide suggestions, examples, resources, and/or other supportive information or ideas for at least one classmate.


Making it Work

Read The Facts of Distance Learning Life. Read Fact 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10.

investigateFinal Project (27 Points Total)

Create the content and technology for an online course, project, or program.

Content Requirement (15 Points)
Design the structure, selected content, and course guide for an online course, project, or program. These materials should be available online and be "ready to use." If you're designing an entire course or year-long program, only one section needs to be complete.

Overall Structure - 2 points
Selected Content (i.e., background information, pathfinders, readings, tutorials, faqs) - 2 points
Learning Guide (i.e., syllabus/overview, guidelines, requirements, procedures, calendar) - 2 points
Course Activities (i.e., discussions, projects, collaborative activities, assignments) - 4 points
Course Assessments (i.e., quiz, checklist, reflection, rubric, portfolio) - 2 points
Management Plan (i.e., promotion, recruitment, maintenance) - 2 points
Overall Impact (i.e., visual appeal, ease of use) - 1 point

Technology Requirement (12 Points)
Your course must include a web presence. In other words, you should have web page(s) that provide the "big picture" of the course or program. This page(s) should then lead to other materials such as blog, wiki, forum, etc. This course starting point may take any form you wish (i.e., Google page, wiki page).

In addition to the overall web presence, you must use at least TWO other technology tools. For instance, you might want to create a WebQuest, record podcasts, build a course wiki, incorporate an online forum, or produce a Flash tutorial. Learn the technology, then incorporate this technology into a module, lesson, or element for your online course.

Web Presence - 4 points
Technology A - 4 points
Technology B - 4 points

Example 1: Public Library Science Fiction Book Club
You might design the structure for an online science fiction book club, but you only need to provide the online materials for the first book you'll be reading, Ender's Game. These materials might include discussion questions, a pathfinder to the works of Orson Scott Card, and an overview of the science fiction genre. You may set up the structure for other books your group will be reading (such as a page with the book title, description, and cover illustration), general discussion and participation guidelines, and a community building activity, but you don't need all of the completed materials. The technologies used in this project include setting up a Ning social network for the web presence including web pages for book information (i.e., pathfinder, background information, faqs), using Audacity to create an audio book talk of the first book in the series, and setting up the forum with the discussion questions for the first book.

Example 2: High School Freshman 21st Century Orientation
You might design a self-instructional, online course for high school freshman in 21st Century Inquiry (what used to be "library skills orientation"). You'll establish seven modules, but only need to complete one of these modules such as Citing Sources. This module includes an overview of information sources and guidelines for citing sources (i.e., books, journal articles, websites, social network discussions, email communications). The module may also include an online tutorial, lots of examples, samples, and practice, as well as quiz. The technologies used include Google Pages for the web presence and module contents, SlideShare for the module tutorial, and an online quiz using Quia.

Share your project URL.


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