| Literature-Technology Connections | Technologies & Approaches |
| STARS1 | STARS2 | STARS3 | STARS4 | STARS5 | STARS6 | STARS7 |
| STARS8 | STARS9 | STARS10 | STARS11 | STARS12 | STARS13 |
| Syllabus | Calendar | Requirements | Projects | CourseQuest |

boy on rocket readingCourseQuest Learning Guide:
Readings and STARs

The Learning Guide leads you through the course readings, STARS assignments, and project requirements. The guide is divided into three sections. First, you'll learn about literature-technology connections and complete Project 1. Next, you'll explore technology tools and approaches to technology-rich learning. Finally, you'll examine online learning options and complete Project 2 and Project 3.

A STARS activity is a short assignment related to your understandings of the readings. Although you have choices related to each assignment, you should be able to address all of the options. Your STARS assignments and responses are posted in Oncourse. For more information about how to address the readings, STARS, and projects, review the Requirements page.

Move through the readings, assignments, and projects below as you move through the semester. Use the Course Calendar to check due dates and Course Checklist to keep track of your progress.

Getting Started

video clipUse the following videos to get to know the instructor and see an introduction to the course. (These are Quicktime videos. Download the player for Mac or Windows):
Annette Lamb's Professional Introduction - Learn a little about Dr. Lamb, the professional.
Annette Lamb's Real Introduction - Learn a little about Annette, the person
Course Introduction - How was this course developed? What will be covered in the course?
Just for Fun - Behind the Scenes: Lamb's Course Videos, Cheesy Blooper, Larry Blooper, and Are You Viewing? Blooper

 

Literature-Technology Connections

Some people see clear connections among information resources. For instance, they see how books, videos, and websites can all be used as a part of a learning experience. A student might read the book "Lord of the Rings", watch the movie, then visit the Tolkien Society Home Page for information about the author. Another student might use the a book review website to select a good novel that explores an environmental issue. After reading a book such as Carl Hiassen's Hoot, the student might use a website pathfinder on environmental concerns to gain insight into the science of the book.

video clipWatch the following QuickTime video.
(Download the player for Mac or Windows)

Course Overview - What technologies and resources will be explored in this course?

In this section of the course you'll learn a process for locating resources and creating your own literature-technology connections.

Complete the following readings and activities.

video clipWatch the following QuickTime video.
(Download the player for Mac or Windows)

Educational Technology - What's the best resource for the job? This clip explores the wealth of resources and technologies that can be used in the classroom.

go to teacher tapRead Technology-Rich Learning: An Overview from Teacher Tap.

Read The K-12 Cybrary at Work by Lesley Farmer at Innovate (Vol. 1, Issue 3, Feb/March 2005). You will need to complete the free registration to access the article.

Read The Future of Learning Technologies: An Interview with Chris Dede by James Morrison and Chris Dede at Innovate (Vol. 1, Issue 1, Oct/Nov 2004). You will need to complete the free registration to access the article.

star graphicSTARS 1 - Technology-Rich Learning Exploration
You DO NOT need to post in all four discussion areas. Go to Oncourse and identify the matching assignment such as "STARS 1 - Technology-Rich Learning Exploration: English/Language Arts". Place your posting in one of the four areas. For two points, you need a quality posting that addresses all items described in your chosen activity. Then, for one point reply to a posting in this area OR any of the other assignments for STARS 1.

Choose ONE of the Apple Learning Interchange technology-rich projects to explore indepth. Summarize the project and describe why you think it is or is not an effective use of technology. Cite a professional source (i.e., textbook, article) from your readings to support this view. Provide examples. From your experience, what do you think would be some of the barriers to completing this type of project in a school or library? Describe how this project could be adapted for a different grade level, subject area, and/or technology. Be sure to include the title of the project and the URL (website address) in your discussion.

Share your findings in one of the four discussion areas: English/Language Arts, Social Studies, Math/Science, or Other.

go to literature laddersRead Literature-Technology Connections from Literature Ladders.

video clipWatch the following QuickTime video.
(Download the player for Mac or Windows)

Literature and the Web - Why reinvent the wheel? Annette introduces the book Holes and the ways you can use the Internet to expand your thinking about the book.

go to the Newberys and the Net Explore Newberys and the Net from Literature Ladders

Go to the Caldecott Connections site Explore Caldecott Connections from Literature Ladders

Go to the Fun with Favorites section Explore Fun with Favorites from Literature Ladders

go to literature laddersRead Ladders of Your Own from Literature Ladders

video clipWatch the following QuickTime video.

Ladders of Your Own: Start
Ladders of Your Own: Books

go to literature ladders Read Ladders of Your Own: Get Started - Explore from Literature Ladders

go to literature laddersRead Ladders of Your Own: Step 1 - Select a Book from Literature Ladders

go to teacher tap Read Book Awards from Teacher Tap.

go to teacher tap Read Book Review Projects from Teacher Tap.

starSTARS 2 - Literature - Technology Connections

You DO NOT need to complete all four of these assignments. Pick ONE to complete. Then, go to Oncourse and identify the matching assignment such as "STARS 2 - Literature-Technology Connections: Caldedotts". Place your posting in one of the four areas. For two points, you need a quality posting that addresses all items described in your chosen activity. Then, for one point reply to a posting in this area OR any of the other assignments for STARS 2.

Choose ONE of the following THREE activities:

Awards. Read one of the books in Newberys and the Net, Caldecott Connections or Fun with Favorites. Explore the activities and links provided. Identify at least three additional websites and describe activities that would connection to this book. Besides the use of websites, what other technology be used with this book? Or, go to Book Awards. Everyone is familiar with the Newbery and Caldecott Awards, but there are many other interesting book awards. For example, the Orbis Pictus award for children's nonfiction. Explore an award you'd like to learn more about. Read an award winning book of your choice. It can be for children, adults, fiction, or nonfiction. Identify at least three websites and describe activities that would connection to this book. Besides the use of websites, what other technology be used with this book?

Online Bookstore. Go to Ladders of Your Own: Step 1 - Select a Book. Spend some time browsing at least THREE online bookstores. Start with a book you or your patrons enjoy. Explore the related books they suggest or books others have purchased. Read the reviews. Describe your experience. Provide specific examples of searches at all three online bookstores and compare your experiences.

Book Reviews. Go to Book Review Projects. Explore the book review sites provided. Choose one and describe how you might use it with students or patrons. Discuss a learning activity that would incorporate use of this website for a particular learning goal.

go to teacher tapRead Electronic Books and Online Reading from Teacher Tap.

go to teacher tapRead Online News Sources from Teacher Tap.

starSTARS 3 - Reading and the Web


Choose ONE of the following FOUR activities:

Young Readers. Go to Electronic Books and Online Reading. Select one website. Provide the title and web address of a specific online reading resource. Summarize the resource. Describe the pros and cons of recommending or using this online reading resource. Include specific examples from the website and how they could used in a specific learning experience, lesson or activity.

Intermediate and Teen Readers. Go to Electronic Books and Online Reading. Select one website. Provide the title and web address of a specific online reading resource. Summarize the resource. Describe the pros and cons of recommending or using this online reading resource. Include specific examples from the website and how they could used in a specific learning experience, lesson or activity.

Adult Readers. Go to Electronic Books and Online Reading. Select one website. Provide the title and web address of a specific online reading resource. Summarize the resource. Describe the pros and cons of recommending or using this online reading resource with children or adults. Include specific examples from the website and how they could used in a specific learning experience, lesson or activity.

News Readers. Go to Online News Sources. Compare and contrast 2-3 similar news sources. Describe the pros and cons of recommending or using this online reading resource with children, teens, or adults. Include specific examples from the website and how they could used in a specific learning experience, lesson or activity.

go to literature laddersRead Ladders of Your Own: Step 2 - Search for Author and Illustrator Information from Literature Ladders

video clipWatch the following QuickTime video.

Ladders of Your Own: Authors
Author Connections - Explore author information on the web.

Teacher Tap icon Read Author and Illustrator Resources from Teacher Tap

Teacher Tap icon Read Face-to-Face and Virtual Author & Illustrator Visits from Teacher Tap

video clipWatch the following QuickTime video.

Ladders of Your Own: Book Information
Ladders of Your Own: Search
42explore Overview - Provides an overview of the 42explore project.

go to literature laddersRead Ladders of Your Own: Step 3 - Search for Book Information and Lessons from Literature Ladders

Teacher Tap icon Go to Online Lesson Plans from Teacher Tap

go to literature laddersRead Ladders of Your Own: Step 4 - Identify Topics and Resources from Literature Ladders

42explore logo Explore 42explore Projects.

Pathfinders are wonderful tools to help users. If you aren't familiar with this approach, go to the Pathfinders, Subject Guides, & Thematic Resources page. Or, take the L595: Electronic Materials for Children and Young Adults course.

starSTARS 4 - Authors, Characters, and Topics Resources


Choose ONE of the following FOUR activities:

Authors and Book Characters. Go to Ladders of Your Own: Step 2 - Search for Author and Illustrator Information. Discuss an author or book character website. If you have a hard time getting started, think about the following questions: What is the purpose of the author's website? How does the website reflect the personality of the author, character, or the author's writing? Do you think the author is actually involved with website development? Why or why not? What would you change or add to this author's website? What features of this website would you encourage others to include in their website? What interesting insights did the author's website provide? How would you use this website with patrons or students? Be specific, would you use the site to answer questions, for writing inspiration, or for other activities?
 
Author Visit. Go to Face-to-Face and Virtual Author & Illustrator Visits. Explore an "author visit" website. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of face-to-face versus virtual visits. What do children and young adults learn for author visits? Are they worth the time and effort? Discuss a website that you found useful in planning for an author visit. What author(s) do you think might be realistic for visits to your area?

42explore. Select a piece of literature you might use with students. Brainstorm topics related to this book. Explore 42explore projects that might be used with this book. Then, use search tools and thematic resources to find AT LEAST THREE websites that you think would help readers better understand the content of a piece of literature. For example, if you're exploring the life of people, check out the 42explore: Biographies. If the book is set in the Holocaust, you might choose a link from 42explore: Holocaust. If the book is set near an active volcano, you might choose a video clip from the 42explore: Volcanoes links page. You might seek out photographs of the author or a particular country or landscape. How about downloading an MP3 song to match the theme of a book or chapter? Share the book title, 1-2 sentence summary of book topic, URL of the webpages, and a reason for using each website with the book.

Book Resources. Go to Ladders of Your Own: Step 3 - Search for Book Information. Explore the book resource and lesson links. Choose a particular book-based lesson or unit and discuss how it might be adapted for use in a learning situation. Was technology included in the lesson? How could you expand your use of technology with this lesson? Then, use Google to search for the book you'd like to use. Rather than searching just by the title, add other words to your search such as anticipation guide, discussion questions, quiz, lesson, project, or webquest. Share your results. What search strategy works best to find good resources to accompany your book? Describe your experience searching for book resources online.

go to literature laddersRead Ladders of Your Own: Step 5 - Develop Meaningful Activities from Literature Ladders

Teacher Tap icon Go to Daily Resources from Teacher Tap

teacher tap icon Go to Electronic Postcards in the Classroom from Teacher Tap.

go to literature laddersRead Ladders of Your Own: Step 6 - Implement and Evaluate from Literature Ladders

go to teacher tapRead Creating Web-based Activities from Teacher Tap.

Teacher Tap icon Go to Student Project Assessment from Teacher Tap

Teacher Tap icon Go to Puzzle, Quiz, and Activity Builders from Teacher Tap

starSTARS 5 - Meaningful Activities & Assessments


Choose ONE of the following FOUR activities:

Activities. Go to Ladders of Your Own: Step 5 - Develop Meaningful Activities. Explore examples of personalized stories, online games, daily activities, and other ideas you might use to add interest to promotional, reading, or writing activities. Then, select one and describe how you might use it. Be sure to include the URL and a detailed description about how you would implement this idea.

Assessments. Go to Ladders of Your Own: Step 6 - Implement and Evaluate. Explore examples of assessment tools. Identify an activity or lessons that needs a quality assessment tool. Develop an assessment such as a Rubric using one of these tools. Share the assignment, need for quality assessment, and the assessment tool you created.

Online Quizzes or Questions. Create an account with one of the quiz services. Create at least two different quizzes or sets of questions. Be sure to provide directions for their use. Discuss how these would be used with a group of students and how they would be graded.

Interactive Games. Download a PowerPoint Jeopardy Template and create a game. Or develop your own game using PowerPoint or an online tool.

Complete Project 1.

 

Technology Tools and Approaches

From collaborative online projects to WebQuests, there are many ways that technology can be used in learning. The key is exploring all the possibilities the selecting approaches that fit the needs of your students. If students need to understand the culture of a book they are reading, consider email communications with children from another country. If students are exploring lesser-known historical figures, the Internet may provide resources not available in the school library. This section of the course will explore technology tools and approaches to technology-rich learning.

Complete the following readings and activities.

Technology Tools

go to teacher tapTen Technology Tools from Teacher Tap

  1. Data/Calculation Tools & Technology
  2. Design Tools & Technology
  3. Discussion Tools & Technology
  4. Email Tools & Technology
  5. Handheld Devices in the Classroom
  6. Instructional Tools & Technology-Rich Learning
  7. Interactive Tools & Technology-Rich Learning - Websites, Games, and Activities
  8. Publishing/Visual Tools & Technology
  9. Multimedia Tools & Technology
  10. Writing Tools & Technology

starSTARS 6 - Software Tools

Choose ONE of the following THREE activities:

Data, Calculation, or Design Tool. Identify a learning need or state a specific content area standard. Use software you already have or download a trial version of suggested software. Describe an activity where students would use this software in their learning. Discuss why technology is an effective tool for addressing this need. Create a completed model project you could use as an example. Attach your sample document to your discussion.

Publishing/Visual Tool. Download the trial version of Inspiration or Kidspiration for Mac or Windows. Or, explore a tool such as KidPix or another imaging tool. Identify a learning need or state a specific content area standard. Describe an activity where students would use this software in their learning. Discuss why technology is an effective tool for addressing this need. Create a completed model project you could use as an example. Attach your sample document to your discussion.

Other Tool. Choose an Interactive Tool or a tool from one of the other categories. Identify a learning need or state a specific content area standard. Describe an activity where students would use this online tool in their learning. Discuss why technology is an effective tool for addressing this need. Create a completed model project you could use as an example. Attach your sample document to your discussion.

Communication and Collaboration Tools

Recently, blogs, wikis and other tools for communication and collaboration have become popular tools in schools and libraries. Use the following resources to learn more about the blog and wiki phenomenon.

escrapbooking Read Blogs and Blogging from escrapbooking.com

Read an article about wiki. Also, explore the Wikipedia.

go to literature laddersRead Collaborative and Interactive Online Projects from Literature Ladders.

starSTARS 7 - Communication Tools

Choose ONE of the following TWO activities:

Bloggers As. Review the Bloggers As page. Consider the categories. As you explore blogs, can you think of other categories? Select a category or subcategory of blog you'd like to explore in-depth. Create criteria for evaluating this type of blog. Then, identify and review at least 5 blogs you'd like to share with the group in this category. Discuss the category and criteria for evaluation. Then, be sure to include the URL, title, description, and review for your 5 favorites.

Discussion Tool. Try an online Discussion Tool. Or, explore Epals or Gaggle.net for email. Identify a learning need or state a specific content area standard. Describe an activity where students would use email, a blog, or a threaded discussion tool in their learning. Discuss why technology is an effective tool for addressing this need. Create a sample threaded discussion, handout of guidelines or discussion questions, or other materials you would use in this type of activity. Provide the URL and password or attach a sample document.

Interactive Online Projects.Go to Interactive Online Projects. Explore the wide range of technology-rich possibilities for collaborative projects. Select one that sounds appealing and discuss how you might join the project, adapt the project, or create your own. Be specific. In addition to saying, "I'd do an ask -the-expert project." Provide the specific email or web address of the online expert you might use. Describe a specific project you think would be interesting for your students or patrons. Feel free to adapt a project you find online.

Internet Issues

Although most people are excited about the potential of technology in learning, others have expressed concerns about the use of emerging technologies. For example, the president of ALA Michael Gorman expressed his opinion in an article in Library Journal titled Revenge of the Blog People. His comments have upset many blog lovers. The controversy over wikis is outlined in an article called The Wikipedia Wars by Kathy Ishizuka (School Library Journal, 11/1/2004).

I found it on the InternetRead the book I Found it on the Internet by Frances Jacobson Harris.

starSTARS 8 - Technology Issues

Choose ONE of the following TWO activities:

Internet Issues. Identify an issue or passage from Harris' book you'd like to explore in-depth. Discuss why you find this topic interesting or significant. Identify and cite a professional article or resource that provides additional information or another perspective. Share your insights and at least one "real world" example or concern. Each student should focus on a different issue related to Internet.

Blog and Wiki Issues. Explore the controversy. Do you think blogs and/or wikis are useful resources for students? Why or why not? Both blogs and wikis have recently been discussed in many library and education journals. Identify an online resource blog, article, or web page that highlights an issue or concern related to blogs or wikis. Summarize the issue. Discuss whether you agree or disagree with the author. Be sure to cite the URL of the website. Each student should cite a different source.

Technology Approaches and Techniques

go to teacher tapEight Approaches to Technology-Rich Learning from Teacher Tap

go to teacher tapRead Technology and Multiple Intelligences from Teacher Tap

starSTARS 9 - Approaches

Choose ONE of the following TWO activities:

Teaching Methods. Go to Teaching Methods from Apple Learning Interchange. Explore examples of how technology can be used with different teaching methods (i.e. Advanced Organizers, Brainstorming...) listed. Try to choose a different method from your classmates. Describe one example. Be sure to include the URL of the example you explored. Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this approach to teaching and learning. Discuss how this idea could be applied to your interest area.

Multiple Intelligences. Design and describe a learning experience that incorporates technology and also addresses at least five of the intelligences. Discuss how this would benefit different learners. Be very specific in terms of activities and technology used.

go to literature laddersRead Themes & Literature Circles from Literature Ladders.

video clipWatch the following QuickTime video.

Literature Circles
Literature Ladders: Themes and Literature Circles

go to literature laddersRead Thematic Learning from Literature Ladders.

go to literature laddersRead Literature Circles from Literature Ladders.

Explore the following examples:

starSTARS 10 - Thematic Learning & Literature Circles

Choose ONE of the following FOUR activities:

Thematic-Children. Read the online article titled Theory to Practice: Thematic Learning Environments. Be sure to read the article titled Themes of Human Experience (off-site link). If you need more information, check out the links at the bottom of the Literature Ladders page. The word "theme" can have many meanings from using a "circus" theme for a special event to a "deep thought" theme such as "courage" or "empathy". This activity gives you a chance to throw in your "two cents". Your mission is to provide an example of a thematic event or project that worked well. Then, describe what it was about the theme that made it effective. Was it the novelty, meaningfulness, fun, or depth that made it work? What specific ways could literature be integrated into your theme? How could technology have been used to make the activity even more effective? Describe a theme-based activity or event. Also, give an example of how literature and technology (i.e. communication, information gathering, materials production) could be integrated.

Thematic-Young Adult/Adult. Read the online article titled Theory to Practice: Thematic Learning Environments. Be sure to read the article titled Themes of Human Experience (off-site link). If you need more information, check out the links at the bottom of the Literature Ladders page. The word "theme" can have many meanings from using a "circus" theme for a special event to a "deep thought" theme such as "courage" or "empathy". This activity gives you a chance to throw in your "two cents". Your mission is to provide an example of a thematic event or project that worked well. Then, describe what it was about the theme that made it effective. Was it the novelty, meaningfulness, fun, or depth that made it work? What specific ways could literature be integrated into your theme? How could technology have been used to make the activity even more effective? Describe a theme-based activity or event. Also, give an example of how literature and technology (i.e. communication, information gathering, materials production) could be integrated.

Lit Circles-Children. Go to Theory to Practice: Literature Circles. Discuss a topic or theme that you think would make a good literature circle. Provide an example of at least two books that could be used. For example, your theme might be disasters with books like Night of the Twister and Earthquake Terror. Use the Internet to learn more about the specific disaster and how people should prepare for that event. Although most literature circles involve a "whole class" theme with small groups each reading a different book related to the topic, you could adapt the idea to include all books by the same author, time period, or character. You could also do it with picture book for adults, poetry, or other forms of literature. Discuss a theme, at least two books that could be included, and one way that technology could be used as part of the project.

Lit Circles-Young Adult/Adult. Go to Theory to Practice: Literature Circles. Discuss a topic or theme that you think would make a good literature circle. Provide an example of at least two books that could be used. For example, your theme might be disasters with books like Night of the Twister and Earthquake Terror. Use the Internet to learn more about the specific disaster and how people should prepare for that event. Although most literature circles involve a "whole class" theme with small groups each reading a different book related to the topic, you could adapt the idea to include all books by the same author, time period, or character. You could also do it with picture book for adults, poetry, or other forms of literature. Discuss a theme, at least two books that could be included, and one way that technology could be used as part of the project.

go to literature laddersRead Literacy Across the Curriculum from Literature Ladders.

starSTARS 11 - Literacy

Complete the following activity.

When you think of the word literacy, you may think of reading. However, many people view literacy in a broader sense.
 
Go to Theory to Practice: Literacy for Today and Tomorrow. Explore the links provided. Then, choose one "new literacy" or "hot topic" that is particularly close to your heart such as the importance of good information evaluation skills or reading for pleasure. Or, select a "hot topic" that concerns you such as plagiarism or copyright.
 
State your topic and take a stand. Is this really a new topic or has it been around in other forms? How has technology impacted the topic? Why do you think this is an important issue, topic, or new literacy? Cite one source you explored.

Share your findings in one of the four discussion areas: Children, Young Adults, and Adult Learners.

video clipWatch the following QuickTime video.

Literature Ladders: Interactivity
Interactive Project Ideas


Online Learning

From web-based tutorials to virtual libraries and schools, a wealth of options are now available for online learning. Let's explore some of these opportunities.

distance learningRead Teaching and Learning at a Distance

Read Online Learning and Virtual Schools (PDF document) by Lamb and Callison in School Library Media Activities Monthly (2005).

Read Guidelines for Establishing Interactivity in Online Courses by Mark Mabrito and Escaping the Comparison Trap: Evaluating Online Learning on Its Own Terms by John Sener in Innovate (Vol 1, Issue 2, Dec/2004/Jan 2005). You will need to complete the free registration to access the article.

Tutorials, Simulations, Games, and Case Studies

Increasingly, educators are using technology-rich materials to present new information, provide practice, and assess learning outcomes. For example, video is a wonderful tool for teaching processes and procedures. Another approach is to provide online tutorials that take students step-by-step through a learning experience. Tutorials are designed to be totally self-instructional so all of the information, activities, and assessments are build into the activity. Although they can be created as web pages, Word and Powerpoint can also be used to build tutorials. Explore the following examples of online tutorials:

go to teacher tapRead Technical Writing: How To's, Tutorials, and Directions from Teacher Tap

go to teacher tapRead Technology Tutorials for Teachers from Teacher Tap

WebQuests

WebQuests take an inquiry-based approach to learning. Students become engaged in an interesting problem or a meaningful task. They are guided through the learning experience and provided with quality resources to help them create a project or solve a problem. Generally these WebQuests are presented to students online, but they can also be provided to students as a Word document or PowerPoint document. In WebQuest, the student is at the center of the learning environment. As such, all the materials must be self-guided rather than teacher-directed.

go to teacher tapRead WebQuests from Teacher Tap

go to literature laddersRead Literature-based WebQuests from Literature Ladders. 

starSTARS 12 - Online Learning


Virtual Schools & Programs.
List (title and URL), analyze, and evaluate three different virtual schools or online programs. Pick one to discuss in-depth. Describe the strengths and weaknesses of the school or program. Who is eligible? How much does it cost? What materials are used? How do students interact with the instructors? What are the implications for traditional schooling?

Interactive Learning.
List (title and URL), analyze, and evaluate three different online tutorials, games, or other interactive learning environments. On a scale of 1 to 10 (hi), rate each of the three and explain why. Pick one to discuss in-depth. Describe the strengths and weaknesses. Would you use it, adapt it, or create a new one from scratch? What changes would you recommend to make the resource more effective?

Literature-based WebQuests. Go to Literature-based WebQuests. List (title and URL), analyze, and evaluate three different WebQuests. On a scale of 1 to 10 (hi), rate each of the three and explain why. Pick one to discuss in-depth. Describe the strengths and weaknesses of the WebQuest. Would you use it, adapt it, or create a new one from scratch? What changes would you recommend to make the WebQuest more effective?

WebQuests. List (title and URL), analyze, and evaluate three different WebQuests. On a scale of 1 to 10 (hi), rate each of the three and explain why. Pick one to discuss in-depth. Describe the strengths and weaknesses of the WebQuest. Would you use it, adapt it, or create a new one from scratch? What changes would you recommend to make the WebQuest more effective?

Evidence-based Practice

Are WebQuests really worth the time and effort? Do students really learn in virtual classrooms? Are online discussions effective? Before you jump into creating tutorials, teaching with WebQuests, or designing online courses, you should have evidence that this approach really works! The professional literature is full of research studies showing the effectiveness of technology-rich learning. Be sure you can justify your approach.

Skim the National Educational Technology Plan from the US Department of Education. Note references to evidence-based practice.
go to teacher tapRead
Technology-Rich Learning and Evidence-based Practice from Teacher Tap

starSTARS 13 - Evidence-based Practice


Is technology REALLY worth the time and effort? Identify a research article that focuses on some aspect of technology-rich learning. For example, it might explore whether threaded discussions elicit high-level thinking. Or, it might compare the WebQuest approach to other inquiry-based activities. The article must be based on original qualitative or quanitative research. What methods were used? Is the study generalizable to other situations? Could you apply the techniques used in the study? Summarize the article, discuss the evidence it provides about the effectiveness of technology in teaching and/or learning, and discuss what further research needs to be done in the future. Be sure to include a complete citation and if possible, a URL. Everyone will post in one area.

Congratulations. You've completed the required readings and STARS. Devote the rest of the semester to completing the final two projects.

Complete Project 2 and Project 3.

Conclusion

Use technology to help bring reading alive for your students and patrons. Making Literature-Technology connections is the first step in designing a technology-rich learning environment.

By using the power of technology, you can create a wide range of learning experiences for your students. Keep in mind that it's not the technology that matters, but how the technology is used to enrich the learning experience.

 


| Syllabus | Calendar | Requirements | Projects | CourseQuest |

Developed by Annette Lamb & Larry Johnson, 12/03. Updated 5/05.