| Syllabus | Calendar | Requirements | Projects | CourseQuest |
| Project 1 | Project 2 | Project 3 |


boy with books & computersCourse Projects

Three projects are required for this course:

 

Project 1: Technology Connection

Your mission is to create a literature-technology connection.

Choose a piece of literature such as a book or article as the focal point of a learning experience. Explore the themes and topics related to this written work, then create materials that could be used as part of a learning experience associated with this literature. Your product for project is the creation of a literature-technology connection. Think of it as a specific type of pathfinder.
 
This project should meet a real-world need. In other words, you should design something that can realistically be implemented in your library, technology area, or classroom. Please note that you can use any of the graphics found at eduscapes or 42explore. Also, book covers are fine to reproduce for educational purposes, they can be found by doing a Google image search.
  
Choose ONE of the following two options:

  • Topic Resource Project. Using the 42eXplore project format as a model, create your own resource page. Although you're free to draw inspiration from the 42explore topics, select a topic that has not already been done. It may be designed for a general audience or focused for a specific audience such as "fourth grade" or "elderly patrons". Include information such as definitions, 4 good starting points, activity ideas, webquest links, lesson plans, vocabulary, etc. You are not required to stick to our categories. Organize ideas to fit your needs. In addition, you can include books, software, documents, and other materials as you wish.
  • Author, Book, Theme, or Genre Focus. Although similar to the 42explore resource idea, this project would focus on an author, book, theme, or genre. For example, it might include author and book lesson links as well as questions and websites to accompany each chapter in a book. It might include a scavenger hunt related to the characters or setting of the book or promotional ideas for a holiday or special event. Consider specific uses of the web materials such as photos that could be printed and used on bulletin boards, audio-rich websites that read poetry aloud, or electronic postcards where students select a visual and write a poem. Use A Single Shard and Holes for ideas. Or, design your own organizational scheme.

Project Submission

Sharing is an important part of learning. Complete the following steps:

  1. Create project in whatever form works best. For example, you might include a Word document, webpage, Inspiration document, or other materials.
  2. Upload your project Word document or web document to the web using the public directory of File Manager in Oncourse, Steel Account, Geocities, or your own web space. This project would be a great addition to an online professional portfolio. Go to Course Requirements for more information.
  3. Write a short narrative describing the reason you chose to create this project and how it fits with your interests as well as the needs of your patrons or students.
  4. Post a message in your Discussion Area including a link to your project URL.
  5. In addition, you MUST to email your instructor the URL. Include the words CourseQuest 1 Project in the email SUBJECT line of the email.

Evaluation

The following checklist will be used to evaluate your project. - 15 Possible Points

  • Short Narrative (audience description, purpose of project) - 1 Point
  • Introduction, Overview, Summary and/or Definitions - 1 Point
    • Motivating, meaningful, error-free, attractive, and well-designed - 1 Point
  • Website resources (at least 20 annotated resources) - 1 Point
    • Useful organization such as categories of resources - 1 Point
    • Includes web page name, URL, and active link - 1 Point
    • Meaningful descriptions such as summary, specific such as reading level or visuals - 1 Point
  • Activities or book connections with specific web links (at least 10 ideas) - 1 Point
    • Directly related to specific aspects of book, author, or topic - 1 Point
    • Quality, high-level thinking and/or creative thinking activities - 1 Point
    • Enhanced elements such as vocabulary or reflective questions - 1 Point
    • Incorporate at least two interactive sites (such as online quiz or activities) - 1 Point
  • Visual Appeal (title, relevant graphic, headings) - 1 Point
    Should be appealing to the intended audience
  • Creative Aspects (innovative, creative approach or ideas that expands the approach) - 1 Point
  • Technical Aspects (web links work, uploaded to the web) - 1 Point
    Includes your name and date page/document was created at bottom of page

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Project 2: Technology-Rich Learning

Your mission is to create a technology-rich learning experience.

Start with a content-area state standard or a particular learning outcome. In other words, what do you want your learners to be able to do? After exploring the approaches, design a technology-rich learning experience.

Your product for this CourseQuest is the creation of a technology-rich learning experience. Your project will contain an APPROACH component, a COLLABORATIVE COMMUNCIATION component, and a TECHNOLOGY component.

You should NOT use the same topic, theme, or book(s) from the first project or in your STARS activities.
 
Your mission is to develop an exciting, technology-rich learning environment. This project should meet a real-world need. In other words, you should design something that can realistically be implemented in your library, technology area, or classroom.

Approach Component

The Approach Component provides an overview of your project, the philosophy behind this type of teaching/learning environment, professional literature to support the approach, detailed activities/assessments related to technology, and discussion of how the Collaborative Communication and Technology Components fit into your overall plan.

Select one of the following approaches or invent your own:

  • Inquiry-based or Project-based Learning Unit. Design the materials for a unit including teacher and student resources, standards, and activities. Student activities should include the use of Internet as well as at least one other technology such as digital cameras, word processing, or Inspiration. You don't need to build the entire unit. However, you should provide at least three detailed activities and matching assessments. If you build a WebQuest, your Approach Component can be build right into the "teacher section" of your WebQuest.
  • Literature Circle Project. Create a plan for a literature circle project. The plan should include information about books you plan to use and links to online information that might be useful for implementation. Describe how the groups will function including roles and activities. Describe at least one way that the groups might use technology including information access, threaded discussions, word processing, digital cameras, music CDs, and other tools and resources.
  • Collaborative Interactive Project. Create a detailed plan for a virtual reading group or other collaborative project that would involve connecting with another person, class, library, or entire school. Your project should include a purpose for the virtual collaboration such as online discussions, peer writing or tutoring, generating data, or sharing projects. This project should focus on a particular book, theme, or topic and include specific activities, resources, timelines, and plans. Describe at least one way students would use technology including information access, threaded discussions, word processing, digital cameras, or email.

Collaborative Communication Component

Build your Collaborative Communication Component and be sure to include the URL and any necessary password into your Approach Component document.

Choose ONE of the following TWO tools:

  • Threaded Discussion. Create a threaded discussion account with a free service such as nicenet.org and develop at least 6 discussion areas or topics. Include directions or questions for each area. Also, create guidelines for use of the forums such as student discussion evaluation criteria, guidelines for discussion ettiquette, and a timelines for the discussion. Include at least one of the following in the discussion area: web links or images.
  • Blog. Create a blog account with a free service such as http://blogger.com and make at least 8 postings. This blog may be used as a model for what students might create. Or, as a tool for student interaction and comments. Include directions or questions as needed. Also, create guidelines for use of the blog such as student evaluation criteria, guidelines for discussion ettiquette, and a timelines for the blogging. Include at least one of the following in the blog area: web links or images.

Technology Component

Choose ONE of the following THREE technologies:

  • WebQuest, PowerQuest, or Other Quest. Create a WebQuest. If you adapt ideas from other WebQuests, the original website must be cited. If wish to copy elements from another WebQuest you must get permission from the author. You can create a WebQuest as web pages, or you can use Word. You can also create a PowerQuest in PowerPoint. If you do this, use the Speaker notes for elaboration. Or, use Inspiration as the "front end" for a modified version of a WebQuest.
    If you build a WebQuest, your Approach Component can be build right into the "teacher section" of your WebQuest.
  • Interactive Books. Create your own electronic book or books. These can be made as web pages or as PowerPoint presentations. They should be designed as reading materials for children or young adults, so carefully consider the vocabulary and reading level. Think about easy to use navigation. Also be sure to include quality visuals and easy-to-read fonts. Your materials should be attractive to your audience. Consider including audio buttons. Your e-book should have a way to easily access each page and return to the first page. Consider a table of contents and title page at the beginning just like a paper book. If you use PowerPoint, you should have at least 25 screens. It should not simply be a PowerPoint presentation. It should use the interactive aspects of PowerPoint such as web links, action buttons, and/or hot spots. Think of it as an electronic picture book or interactive textbook.
  • Tutorial, Simulation, or Case Study. Create web pages, PowerPoint, and/or video to create a tutorial, simulation, or case study to address a specific learning need. In addition to information, it must include questioning, assessment, or some other type of interactive learning element.

Project Submission

Sharing is an important part of learning. Complete the following steps:

  1. Create project in whatever form works best. For example, you might include a Word document, webpage, Inspiration document, PowerPoint, or other materials.
  2. Upload your documents and other materials to the web using the public directory of File Manager in Oncourse, Steel Account, Geocities, or your own web space. You could also use the Drop Box. This project would be a great addition to an online professional portfolio. Go to Course Requirements for more information.
  3. Write a short narrative describing the reason you chose to create this project and how it fits with your interests as well as the needs of your patrons or students.
  4. Post a message in your Discussion Area including a link to your project URL.
  5. In addition, you MUST to email your instructor the URL. Include the words CourseQuest 2 Project in the email SUBJECT line of the email.
  6. If your project is too large to upload to the web or File Manager, you can submit the project on a CD. However, please contact your instructor ahead of time for the best mail address.

Evaluation

The following checklist will be used to evaluate your project. - 30 Possible Points

  • Narrative (1/1 Points)
    • Purpose of the project (i.e., audience, needs) - .5 Point
    • Overview of project - .5 Point
  • Approach Component (10/10 Points)
    • Quality, detailed plan - 1 Point
    • Professional literature to support this approach - 1 Point
    • Standard(s) with matching activities and assessments - 3 Point
    • Sample materials, handouts, good examples - 2 Point
    • Quality materials (i.e., books, websites, video/audio) - 1 Point
    • Technology-rich activities - 1 Point
    • Effective approach - 1 Point
  • Collaborative Communication Component (8/8 Points)
    • Basic requirement - 3 Points
    • Quality content - 3 Point
    • Good use of technology - 1 Point
    • Works without errors - 1 Point
  • Technical Component (8/8 Points)
    • Basic requirement - 3 Points
    • Quality content - 3 Point
    • Good use of technology - 1 Point
    • Works without errors - 1 Point
    Overall (3/3 Points)
    • Well-written, correct - 1 Point
    • Realistic and technology-rich - 1 Point
    • Creative, interesting, and attractive - 1 Point

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Project 3: Evidence-based Practice

Your mission is to select something you've done this semester to (a) field test with "real" people, (b) provide documentation that your approach is based on evidence, and (c) reflect on the experience.

Project Summary

Select some aspect of one of your projects or a STARS activity to implement. Feel free to focus, refine, or modify the project to fit the needs of your patrons or students. In other words, you could conduct the project with an individual or small group rather than an entire class. Or, you may focus on one aspect of the project rather than the entire project. Summarize the project you implemented.

Research Component

Your implementation project must focus on an evidence-based approach. Read Identifying and Implementing Educational Practices Supported by Rigorous Evidence (December 2003) from the the Institute of Education Science (IES). Your job is to either provide evidence (i.e., research articles, professional citations, statistics from national reports) that your approach already has "strong" or "possible" evidence of effectiveness or discuss how you would collect evidence. Cite and discuss research studies that provide this evidence. What other studies could be conducted to strengthen the support for this intervention or approach? What could you do in a library or classroom setting to test out these ideas?

Field Test Component

You need to use technology resources you created such as handouts, web pages, your blog, your threaded discussion, or other materials with people. It's NOT acceptable to just ask someone to "look at your materials". They need to use them or interact with them like a student. You must collect evidence of your field test such as checklists, rubrics, quizzes, student projects, or digital camera pictures. For threaded discussions or blogs, you simply need people to add to your resource. In addition, you need written or recorded comments from your users about their experience.

Describe the field test and provide samples of evidence such as sample student KidPix project, student PowerPoint presentation, student generated discussion postings, and/or digital camera photos of the experience.

Reflection

Think about your experiences with technology-rich learning. What were the strengths, weaknesses, and challenges? What would you do differently given a similar situation? What would you like to learn to do with technology? How do you think technology will change in the future?

Project Submission

Complete the following steps:

  1. Turn in electronic document(s) (i.e., Word attachment, webpage URL) containing the following information:
    Summary of Project. A summary of the technology-rich learning experience including a short narrative describing the audience, technology used, timeline and activities completed and a discussion of the strengths, weaknesses, and challenges of field testing along with specific examples. In other words, tell me what you did!
    Research Component. A discussion of the research evidence showing that your approach is effective. Or, discussing how this information could be collected. In other words, tell me why your approach is effective!
    Field Test Component. An evidence collection such as a teaching or promotional materials, student products, photos from an event, copies of email or threaded discussions (or link to URL), reflection of a participant, student assessment results, and/or other materials citing performance or impact such as assignments, evaluations, or comments. Be sure to ask permission to share personal work and comments. In other words, show me what they did!
    Reflection. A reflection (paragraphs, not pages) describing the impact of this project on your thinking about teaching and/or learning; the pros and cons of this approach to literature, libraries, and technology rich learning; and speculation on future projects you might implement. In other words, tell me what you thought about what you did!
  2. Email your instructor the project as an email attachment. Include the words Implementation Project in the email SUBJECT line of the email. It's easiest to email your project as an attachment. However, if you would rather send your project through traditional mail, please check with your instructor and find out what address is best.

Evaluation

The following checklist will be used to evaluate your project. - 15 Possible Points

  • Summary of Project - 3 Points
  • Research Component - 3 Points
  • Field Test Component - 5 Points
  • Reflection - 2 Points
  • Overall - 2 Points

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Project Ideas

Technology is always changing. This course has been taught for several years. The requirements for this course change each semester, so none of the examples from previous semesters will match with the assignments above. On the other hand, we'll provide a few projects that might stimulate ideas.


| Syllabus | Calendar | Requirements | Projects | CourseQuest |

Developed by Annette Lamb & Larry Johnson, 12/03. Updated 5/05.